Class · Diversions · observations · power · Sexualities · Sociology

“Race”, Gendered Relations, and Sterling

What is really troubling about the whole Sterling affair is not his racism, which has been common knowledge for some time, but the gender relations that have not been discussed at all. Sterling’s racist rants were only made public by his former mistress when she found her back against the wall, put there by the lawsuit filed against her by Sterling’s wife. What kind of witch is she?

Mrs. Sterling is seeking to obtain more than a million American dollars from the mistress who seduced her husband, duped him into giving her millions in money and goods. Could such an arrogant bastard really be that easily convinced to part with a few of the dollars he has amassed from the labors and sufferings of others? No, I don’t think so.

Why isn’t Mrs. Sterling putting pressure in the proper place, on her beast of a husband? I’m sure she isn’t afraid of him. Is this typical behavior of a woman whose husband is an adulterer, to put the blame on the other woman? Surely, she’s done this because she won’t give up the lifestyle being married to such an anal orifice affords her. I can’t help feeling she’s a bit of a coward and as much of a bully and control freak as her husband. They were made for one another.

The mistress is, of course, wrong. She should never have made the decision to have anything to do with a married man. She was the one seduced by the money, gifts, and I suppose the prestige (?) of being Sterling’s other woman, of which I’m certain there have been many. However, none of these issues has been discussed in the media. The focus has been on “race” and race seems to mean only black. I have a problem with this.

There are, to my way of thinking, several ethnic groups represented in this menage. There are the players, who are Black and Anglo. There are the Sterlings, who are Jewish, which might mean Anglo with a cultural twist. There is the mistress, who is both Black and Latino. These are all cultural, or ethnic, groups. Race is about skin color, pure and simple. This is why news articles always write black with a lower case b. They are not talking about a cultural group, but about skin color. They then confuse the issue by capitalizing the misnomer African-American, a term that applies, rightly, to President Obama, but not to Blacks who defined themselves using the pan-African term Black in a show of global solidarity with all people of color, and a demonstration of self-definition and power in the 1960s.

A very big deal was made about denigration of others based on skin color. Nothing was made of the immoral, adulterous behavior of Sterling or his mistress. Nothing was made of the bullying, passive-aggressive behavior of Mrs. Sterling.

Why talk about any of it if all of the mess isn’t going to be addressed?

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Sourest of Grapes: A letter from the great-great-granddaughter of Jesse B. Semple

 

Hey, Grrl!

Mom told me that them Texas crackers didn’t ‘preciate seeing Black people doing better than they were. Didn’t like the fact that even though they had their collective foot on Black folks’ neck that they had better cars, better houses, dressed with style and flair, and the men had far more sexually exotic women.

My bf told me his dad would not drive the new car he’d earned working hard for Mr. Chawly every day because he’d never get another raise or promotion if he did.

Bronco Baama didn’t carry the white, working-class-wanna-be-middle-class men because they don’t like the fact that he’s got a better car, better house, is better dressed and has a wife who is way hotter than theirs. He irks Congress because he’s beaten them at their own game, broken down the gates of the last bastion of the good ol’ boys, and looks better while he plays.

Let us not forget he IS a lawyer. Indicating he’s better educated, well-traveled, intercultural, and while many have tried to question his birthplace, no one has challenged his credentials.  Yet, I heard Mittens call Bronco Baama a boy and a liar, in front of millions, with the recalling of one anecdote during the first presidential debate. He’s the mouthpiece of his undereducated, working-and-lower-class, underinformed, tea-party base (crackas), which is ludicrous as he’s rich as Croesus and hasn’t much of a clue about how the little people live, despite his experience as a Mormon bishop.

The last gasp of a redundant class smells of the sourest of grapes.

Chin-Chin; (I learned that watching Call the Midwife. I absolutely adore Chummy!)

Jesseca

Why Uncle Joe can do what he do